Sam,<br><br>Terminology of Iaas is defenitely tilted toward soft view, hence why it seems to fall into SaaS terminology. I recommend we make sure that terminology is consistent from a software and system administrator stand-point who often our the &quot;owners&quot; of this infrasture.<br>
<br>- Colleen<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Apr 19, 2009 at 9:37 AM, Sam Johnston <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:samj@samj.net">samj@samj.net</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div class="im">On Sun, Apr 19, 2009 at 6:14 PM, Krishna Sankar (ksankar) <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:ksankar@cisco.com" target="_blank">ksankar@cisco.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">

<div>But then SaaS is Software over PaaS; PaaS is fabric over IaaS; IaaS is compute, storage and network. Isn&#39;t fabric the P is PaaS ? and in IaaS, we see raw compute/storage/network ?<br>
<br>
If we want to maintain the Software-Platform-Infrastructure terminology hierarchy I am fine with that. Then we should switch the fabric and the Compute-Storage-Network.</div></blockquote></div><br></div>[Ab]use of the term &quot;<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fabric_computing" target="_blank">fabric</a>&quot; to refer to software platforms like Azure is so far as I can tell a fairly recent trend (and one I&#39;m relatively unconvinced by). Granted the contept (whereby many interconnected nodes, when viewed from a distance, appear to be a single coherent &quot;fabric&quot;) could be applied to both hardware and software, but it is <a href="http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/f/fabric.html" target="_blank">most often applied</a> to low level, interconnected hardware such as SANs and InfiniBand... and <a href="http://www.itbusinessedge.com/cm/community/features/interviews/blog/fabric-computing/?cs=22018" target="_blank">servers</a>:<br>

<br><blockquote style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;" class="gmail_quote"><span></span><b>What is fabric computing and how does it improve upon current server technology?</b><br>

The simplest way to think about it is the next-generation architecture
for enterprise servers. Fabric computing combines powerful server
capabilities and advanced networking features into a single server
structure.<br></blockquote><br>We do need something to refer to the underlying hardware/firmware but I&#39;m even less convinced by proposed alternatives (&quot;unified computing&quot; being the most obvious example). Perhaps &quot;Hardware Fabric&quot; would clarify?<br>
<font color="#888888">
<br>Sam<br><br>
</font><br>_______________________________________________<br>
occi-wg mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:occi-wg@ogf.org">occi-wg@ogf.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.ogf.org/mailman/listinfo/occi-wg" target="_blank">http://www.ogf.org/mailman/listinfo/occi-wg</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>==========<br>Colleen Smith<br>email:   <a href="mailto:colleen1@gmail.com">colleen1@gmail.com</a><br>