One recent post by one analyst which concedes that it&#39;s a &quot;<i>problematic term, perhaps, because a few of the vendors employ it towards different ends</i>&quot; isn&#39;t reason enough to scuttle it (which has been in fairly widespread use for <a href="http://www.dominopower.com/issuesprint/issue199810/fabric.html">well over a decade</a>), especially in the absence of an alternative proposal. Appistry have dropped the term and Microsoft&#39;s Azure is now a &quot;<a href="http://www.microsoft.com/azure/default.mspx">Services Platform</a>&quot; (someone&#39;s dyslexic perhaps), even if they still use fabric sporadically with developers.<br>
<br>This is what Cisco have to say about <a href="http://www.cisco.com/en/US/netsol/ns945/index.html">Unified Fabrics</a>:<br><blockquote style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;" class="gmail_quote">
<i><span class="content"><p class="expanded-spacing">The typical data
center environment supports two to three parallel networks: one for
data, one for storage, and possibly one for server clustering. In
addition, servers often have dedicated interfaces for management,
backup, or virtual machine live migration. Supporting these interfaces
imposes significant costs related to interfaces, cabling, rack space,
upstream switches, and power and cooling.</p>
            
            <p class="expanded-spacing">Unified
fabric consolidates these different types of traffic onto a single,
general-purpose, high-performance, highly available network that
greatly simplifies the network infrastructure and reduces costs. To do
all this, a unified fabric must be intelligent enough to identify the
different types of traffic and handle them appropriately.</p>
            
            <p class="expanded-spacing">In
addition to reducing total cost of ownership, unified fabric supports
broader data center virtualization by providing consistent, ubiquitous
network and storage services to all connected devices.</p></span></i></blockquote>I&#39;d like to see us get some clarity here one way or another because it&#39;s a source of significant confusion (if we can&#39;t get it right between us then what are customers meant to think?).<br>
<br>Sam<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Apr 19, 2009 at 6:38 PM, Alexis Richardson <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:alexis.richardson@gmail.com">alexis.richardson@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
Fabric is also used to refer to PaaS:<br>
<a href="http://redmonk.com/sogrady/2008/11/14/cloud-types/" target="_blank">http://redmonk.com/sogrady/2008/11/14/cloud-types/</a><br>
<br>
I suggest we drop the word &#39;fabric&#39;.<br>
<div><div></div><div class="h5"><br>
<br>
On Sun, Apr 19, 2009 at 5:37 PM, Sam Johnston &lt;<a href="mailto:samj@samj.net">samj@samj.net</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt; On Sun, Apr 19, 2009 at 6:14 PM, Krishna Sankar (ksankar)<br>
&gt; &lt;<a href="mailto:ksankar@cisco.com">ksankar@cisco.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; But then SaaS is Software over PaaS; PaaS is fabric over IaaS; IaaS is<br>
&gt;&gt; compute, storage and network. Isn&#39;t fabric the P is PaaS ? and in IaaS, we<br>
&gt;&gt; see raw compute/storage/network ?<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; If we want to maintain the Software-Platform-Infrastructure terminology<br>
&gt;&gt; hierarchy I am fine with that. Then we should switch the fabric and the<br>
&gt;&gt; Compute-Storage-Network.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; [Ab]use of the term &quot;fabric&quot; to refer to software platforms like Azure is so<br>
&gt; far as I can tell a fairly recent trend (and one I&#39;m relatively unconvinced<br>
&gt; by). Granted the contept (whereby many interconnected nodes, when viewed<br>
&gt; from a distance, appear to be a single coherent &quot;fabric&quot;) could be applied<br>
&gt; to both hardware and software, but it is most often applied to low level,<br>
&gt; interconnected hardware such as SANs and InfiniBand... and servers:<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; What is fabric computing and how does it improve upon current server<br>
&gt;&gt; technology?<br>
&gt;&gt; The simplest way to think about it is the next-generation architecture for<br>
&gt;&gt; enterprise servers. Fabric computing combines powerful server capabilities<br>
&gt;&gt; and advanced networking features into a single server structure.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; We do need something to refer to the underlying hardware/firmware but I&#39;m<br>
&gt; even less convinced by proposed alternatives (&quot;unified computing&quot; being the<br>
&gt; most obvious example). Perhaps &quot;Hardware Fabric&quot; would clarify?<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Sam<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br>